FAO - Key to subfamilies of Gobiidae occurring in the Western Central

Pacific by Helen Larson and E.O. Murdy

If you use this key please cite the following in publications:
Larson, H.K. and Murdy, E.O. 2001. Gobiidae. Gobies. Pp 3578-3603.
In: Carpenter, K.E. and Niem, V.H. (eds) FAO species identification guide for fishery purposes.
The living marine resources of the western Central Pacific. Volume 6. Bony fishes part 4 (Labridae to Latimeriidae). FAO, Rome.

1a. Dorsal and anal fins connected to caudal fin, both dorsal fins united by
membrane; mud-burrowing, elongate gobies with pink to purple
skin................................................................................................. Amblyopinae

  

1b. Dorsal and anal fins separated from caudal fin, both dorsal fins typically separate.................. 2

  

2a. Lower jaw typically possessing only a single row of teeth.................................................... 3 

  

2b. Lower jaw typically possessing more than one row of teeth................................................. 4

  

3a. Pelvic frenum with fleshy lobes over spines; eyes lateral......................................... Sicydiinae

 

3b. Pelvic frenum without fleshy lobes; body elongate; eyes located mostly dorsally... Oxudercinae

 

4a. Paired anterior interorbital pores present or head pores completely lacking. Pelvic frenum simple,
not folded forward, frenum without fleshy lobes around pelvic spines. If head pores absent, then one or
more of the following conditions also exist: 1) pelvic frenum is present; 2) body fully scaled or mostly scaled;
and/or 3) no barbels present on chin [except for one genus, Gnatholepis, only non-coral reef gobies are
included here. Gnatholepis possesses head pores.].
.................................... Gobionellinae (sensu Pezold, 1993)

 

4b. Usually a single anterior interorbital pore present or head pores completely lacking. If two anterior
interorbital pores present, then pelvic frenum folded forward and a fleshy lobe present around each
spine. If head pores absent, then one or more of the following conditions also exist: 1) pelvic frenum is
absent; 2) body naked or with a few scales on caudal peduncle; and/or 3) barbels present on chin
[although exceptions exist, head pores are typically absent only in a few small coral reef
gobies]............................................................................................... Gobiinae (sensu Pezold, 1993)

 

 

Key to the genera of Amblyopinae occurring in the area

(from Shibukawa and Murdy, unpubl.)

 

Note: There are several known species that do not belong to any described genus; these are not
included in the key (see species list).

 

1a. Pelvic fins moderate to large, pelvic fin length 64% or more of head length (typically greater
than 70%); pelvic fins always fully united and forming a disc.......................... 2 (Taenioides Group)

1b. Pelvic fins small to moderate, pelvic fin length 62% or less of head length, (typically less
than 40%); pelvic fins fully united forming a disc (Caragobius and Trypauchen), or emarginate
posteriorly (Amblyotrypauchen and Ctenotrypauchen), or completely separate
(Trypauchenichthys).................................... 5 (Trypauchen Group)

 

2a. Head and body with distinct cutaneous ridges; upper lip thick, fleshy, with fringed dorsal margin;
caudal fin short, the length usually subequal to head length; ventral surface of lower jaw usually with
several clusters of long, fleshy barbels; head and body entirely naked................................. Taenioides

2b. Head without distinct cutaneous ridges; upper lip thick or thin, not fringed dorsally; caudal fin long or
very long, the length usually greater than head length (excluding Brachyamblyopus); head with or without
barbels; minute cycloid scales at least on posterior part of body (sometimes difficult to discern without
magnification).................... 3

 

3a. Most pectoral-fin rays simple, free from fin membrane; pectoral-fin rays 20-65, usually more than 23   4

3b. Most pectoral-fin rays branched, not forming free rays; pectoral-fin rays 23 or fewer Brachyamblyopus

 

4a. Head and body subcylindrical (slightly compressed posteriorly), greatly elongate, body depth less than
10 % of standard length; teeth on outermost row of jaws enlarged, fang-like (Fig. 5); a pair of symphysial canines
on lower jaw; scales minute, typically smaller than eye diameter (except for those on posterior
half of body).................................................................................................................. Odontamblyopus

4b. Head and body compressed, rather short, body depth 14.1-16.0 % of standard length; teeth of
outermost row of jaws close-set, flattened, not fang-like; no symphysial canine teeth on
lower jaw; scales large, distinctly larger than eye diameter................................................... Pseudotrypauchen

 

5a. A pouch-like cavity at dorsal margin of operculum present (Fig. 4); pectoral fin emarginate, asymmetrical
dorsoventrally, with large upper lobe; pore-like posterior nostril enlarged, distinctly greater than eye; frontal crest
well-developed, prominent in external view, sometimes with serrated dorsal margin (sometimes invisible in external
view); segmented caudal-fin rays 9+8, including 8+7 branched rays.............................................................. 6

5b. No pouch-like cavity at dorsal margin of operculum; pectoral fin rounded, symmetrical dorsoventrally;
pore-like posterior nostril subequal to eye diameter; dorsal margin of frontal crest usually visible externally,
but not prominent; segmented caudal-fin rays usually 7+6, including 6+5 branched rays....................... Caragobius

 

6a. Fang-like teeth on jaws; some scale patches on head.................. .Amblyotrypauchen

6b. No fang-like teeth on jaws (teeth on outer row sometimes strongly caninoid); head typically naked  ....7 

7a. Pelvic fins separated to base; I,3 pelvic-fin rays; frontal crest prominent with distinct serrated dorsal margin and
horn-like projection directed anteriorly (at least in adults)................................. Trypauchenichthys

7b. Pelvic fins united medially (sometimes emarginate posteriorly); I,5 pelvic-fin rays; frontal crest prominent, sometimes
with weak serration along dorsal margin, but not projecting anteriorly..................................... 8

 

8a. Belly fully scaled (sometimes with narrow naked area along ventral midline), typically not possessing ventral
keel; pelvic fins united and rounded posteriorly, typically forming funnel-like disc............. Trypauchen

8b. Belly naked, with prominent ventral keel; pelvic fins connected medially, but
emarginate posteriorly, not forming a disc............................................................................. Ctenotrypauchen

 

 

Key to the genera of Sicydiinae occurring in the area

  

1a. Comb-like or tricuspid teeth in either upper or lower jaw, conical teeth may be present also... 2

1b. No comb-like or tricuspid teeth in either jaw, only conical teeth present.................... Sicyopus

 

2a. Upper jaw with small tricuspid teeth at front and conical teeth at side; lower jaw with
small horizontal teeth at front only and conical teeth behind.............................................. Lentipes

2b. Upper jaw with all tricuspid teeth; lower jaw with horizontal teeth along whole length and conical
teeth behind .................................................................................................................3

 

3a. Gap in middle of upper jaw tooth rows; more than 50 scales in lateral series......... Sicyopterus

3b. No gap in middle of upper jaw tooth rows which form continuous band
of tricuspid teeth; fewer than 50 scales in lateral series........................................................ Stiphodon

 

 

Key to the genera of Oxudercinae occurring in the area

  

1a. Lower eyelid (dermal cup) absent........................................................................... 2

1b. Lower eyelid (dermal cup) present......................................................................... 7

  

2a. Spinous dorsal fin with five spines........................................................................... 3

2b. Spinous dorsal fin with six spines............................................................................ 5

  

3a. Second dorsal fin with 23 or fewer total elements; anal fin with 23 or fewer total elements......

.................................................................................................................. Apocryptes

3b. Second dorsal fin with 27 or more total elements; anal fin with 26 or more total elements.........

.................................................................................................................................. 4

 

4a. Second dorsal fin 27-30; caudal-fin length typically more than 23% SL; head length greater than 22% SL .....Zappa

4b. Second dorsal fin I, 28-32; caudal-fin length 23% SL or less; head length less than 22% SL........... Pseudapocryptes

 

5a. Second dorsal fin with 24 or fewer total elements, modally fewer; anal fin with 23 or
fewer total elements; longitudinal scale count fewer than 60............................................................. Apocryptodon

5b. Second dorsal fin with 24 or more total elements, modally more; anal fin with 24 or more total
elements, modally more; longitudinal scale count typically more than 60............................................................... 6

 

6a. No prominent canine tooth lateral to upper jaw symphysis; head length 24% SL or less; second
dorsal-fin base typically 45% SL or greater; caudal-fin length 19% SL or greater.......................... Parapocryptes

6b. Prominent canine tooth (about twice as long as others) on each side of upper jaw symphysis;
head length 24% SL or greater; second dorsal-fin base 45% SL or less; caudal-fin length 19% SL
or less.............................................................................................................................. Oxuderces

 

7a. Two canine teeth internal to lower jaw symphysis; anal-fin base and second dorsal-fin base 34% SL or greater 8

7b. No canine teeth internal to lower jaw symphysis; anal-fin base and second dorsal-fin base 27% SL or less        9

 

8a. Barbels present on underside of head................................................................... Scartelaos

8b. No barbels on underside of head................................................................. Boleophthalmus

 

9a. A single row of teeth in upper jaw; teeth blunt, not curved............................ Periophthalmus

9b. Two rows of teeth in upper jaw; outermost teeth large and curved............ Periophthalmodon

 

 

Key to the genera of Gobionellinae occurring in the area

 

1a. Head pores absent............................................................................................................ 2

1b. Head pores present (sometimes only preopercular pores present)......................................... 8

  

2a. First element of second dorsal and anal fins is always unsegmented...................................... 3

2b. All elements of second dorsal and anal fins segmented........................................................ 6

 

3a. Papillae in interorbital space many, small, close-set, forming long curved row around top
of each eye; mouth may be enlarged in males........................................................................... 4

3b. Papillae in interorbital space few, widely spaced in loose row around each eye; mouth
extremely enlarged in males  .............................................................................................     5

 

4a. Intestine long and coiled into three loops; pectoral rays 11-13; restricted to
Australia
............................................................................................................... Chlamydogobius

4b. Intestine simple, with one “S-bend” loop; pectoral rays 13-20; Indo-Pacific........ Mugilogobius

 

5a. 16 segmented caudal fin rays; several estuarine species, pale to brownish with dark spots and
blotches .......................................................................................................Calamiana (in part)

5b. 17 segmented caudal fin rays; one estuarine species, plain grey
colour...................
....................................................................... Eugnathogobius (in part)

 

6a. Body usually naked below first dorsal fin; head papillae in transverse pattern; body
transparent or yellowish translucent in life (fresh and brackish waters)................................. Gobiopterus

6b. Body usually fully scaled; head papillae usually in longitudinal pattern; body with dusky bands or spots   7

  

7a. Adults small, up to 25 mm SL; robust-bodied gobies with distinctive banded color pattern
(brackish to freshwater)................................................................................................ Brachygobius

7b. Adults very small, at most reaching 15 mm SL; slender-bodied gobies with one dusky band extending
from first dorsal fin, remainder of body with incomplete bands and blotches (brackish water)................. Pandaka

  

8a. None or one pair of pores present on snout......................................................................... 9

8b. Two pairs of pores present on snout................................................................................. 16

  

9a. Body naked, mostly freshwater.................................................................. Schismatogobius

9b. Body scaled, at least on its posterior half; brackish to freshwater........................................ 10

  

10a. 17 segmented caudal fin rays.......................................................................................... 12

10b. 16 segmented caudal fin rays.......................................................................................... 11

 

11a. Mouth terminal, enlarged in males; gut simple, forming “S-bend” loop; headpores usually
absent  .....................................................................................................Calamiana (in part)

11b. Mouth small, usually subterminal, with rounded snout overhanging mouth; some headpores always
present; entire gut spirally coiled about its longitudinal axis.................................................... Pseudogobius

 

12a. Head papillae longitudinal; if transverse rows present, then lateral canal over preopercle
and/or opercle present also; coloring variable.............................................................................................. 13

12b. Head papillae with many transverse rows; head pores typically present but lateral
canal over opercle always absent; distinctively spotted species............................................................ Stigmatogobius

  

13a. Preopercular pores and lateral canal present or absent (depending on species); gut short, with
only 2-3 loops; jaws may be greatly enlarged in males, lips not reduced and thin.................................................... 14

13b. Preopercular pores and lateral canal always absent; gut long and coiled into many loops
(12 or more); mouth small, lower lip reduced, thin and folded forward................................................. Hemigobius

  

14a. No pores over top of opercle (one present above rear margin of preopercle); preopercular pores
present or absent; second dorsal and anal fins with equal numbers of rays or soft dorsal with one more
ray than anal........................................................................................................................... 15

14b. Two pores present over top of opercle (as well as one present above rear margin of preopercle;
three preopercular pores usually present; anal fin with one or two more rays than in second dorsal fin............. Rhinogobius

 

15a. Head depressed; body cylindrical or somewhat elongate; mouth large, especially in
males, reaching beyond middle of eye................................................................................ Eugnathogobius (in part)

15b. Head compressed, body often compressed, few species elongate; mouth small and
terminal in females, large and inferior to subinferior in males.................................................................. Redigobius

 

16a. Shoulder girdle under gill cover with distinct fleshy lobes (1-4 finger-like flaps).................. 17

16b. Shoulder girdle under gill cover smooth or with minute bumps........................................... 18

 

17a. Head broader than deep; mouth inferior with fleshy lips; predorsal scale count
16-42; body with rows of blotches and spots.......................................................................................... Awaous

17b. Head compressed, narrower than deep; mouth terminal, lips not particularly fleshy; predorsal scale
count 0-23; body with variably developed transverse bands........................................................................ Stenogobius

  

18a. Cheek with large scales; teeth at sides of upper jaw directed medially; anterior interorbital pore
paired; mouth horizontal, inferior (coral reefs)............................................................................................... Gnatholepis

18b. Cheek naked; teeth at sides of jaws vertical or directed posteriorly................................... 19

 

19a. Median membranous crest or ridge usually present on nape; teeth in upper jaw usually in a single row, may have
a few teeth on inner row anteriorly; eye with or without fleshy knob or tentacle; tongue rounded .......Oxyurichthys

19b. No crest or ridge on nape; typically, teeth in upper jaw in two or three rows; eye always
without fleshy knob or tentacle; tongue truncate..................................................................................... Oligolepis

 

 

Key to the described genera of Gobiinae occurring in the area

NOTE: Many genera remain to be adequately revised or defined; consequently the key is not guaranteed
to work for all species of a genus. Some genera will key out in more than one place in the key. There are
several known species which do not belong to any described genus; these are not included in the key.

 

1a. First gill slit closed by membrane; distinctive transverse papillae pattern on head (coral reefs) Hetereleotris

1b. First gill slit open; papillae pattern longitudinal or transverse.................................................. 2

 

2a. Body naked or with a few scales on caudal peduncle........................................................... 3

2b. Body scaled at least on posterior half.................................................................................. 8

  

3a. Pelvic fins separate and slender......................................................................................... 4

3b. Pelvic fins united............................................................................................................... 5

 

4a. Body deep, robust, eyes small (coral reefs)...................................................... Austrolethops

4b. Body slender, eyes moderate to large (coral reefs)................................. Trimmatom (in part)

 

5a. Teeth tricuspid; body slender (rocky shores)....................................................... Kelloggella

5b. Teeth pointed.................................................................................................................... 6

  

6a. Body short and/or compressed; anal fin with 10 or fewer elements, including spine................ 7

6b. Body elongate; anal fin with 13 elements, including spine (sandy shores).......... Parkraemeria

  

7a. Head and body deep and compressed; body and fins with thick mucous coat; pelvic
fins short and fleshy (coral reefs).............................................................................................. Gobiodon

7b. Body short and robust, compressed posteriorly but head usually rounded; mucous coat
not greatly developed; pelvic fins not fleshy (deepwater)........................................................ Lubricogobius

 

8a. Thin dermal crest on top of head anterior to first dorsal fin................................................... 9

8b. No dermal crest anterior to first dorsal fin......................................................................... 11

 

9a. Sensory papillae on head transverse; body relatively plain dark brown, with dark
blotch on shoulder just above pectoral fin base (estuaries).................................................... Lophogobius (in part)

9b. Sensory papillae on head longitudinal; colour pattern variable, often with small dark spots..... 10

 

10a. Dermal crest low, less than pupil diameter; body elongate; soft dorsal and anal
rays I, 12 (estuaries, shallow reefs)................................................................................... Cryptocentroides

10b. Dermal crest high, more than pupil diameter; body deep; soft dorsal and anal rays I,9 (estuaries) .......Cristatogobius

  

11a. Barbels present on ventral surface of head (may be on chin only), barbels distinctly larger than
any elongate papillae..............................................................................................................12

11b. Papillae on underside of head may be elongate, but no barbels present.............................. 16

 

12a. Large black spot present dorsally on caudal fin; cheek and opercle covered with scales
(deepwater) ..............................................................................................  Parachaeturichthys

12b. No large black spot on caudal fin; no scales on cheek or opercle....................................... 13

 

13a. One or two distinct folds on cheek; headpores present or absent; barbels in several pairs or
small groups ............................................................................................................................15

13b. No folds on cheek; headpores always present, including one or two over opercle; barbels profuse
or one pair only .........................................................................................................................14

 

14a. Barbels on head profuse, slender, forming fringe around head (coral reefs)..... Barbuligobius

14b. Barbels reduced to small pair on chin (freshwater to estuaries)........... Glossogobius (in part)

 

15a. Barbels only present on chin; entire fish greatly dorsoventrally flattened and elongate
(deep reefs) ..................................................................................................Platygobiopsis

15b. Barbels may be present on chin, snout and sides of head; fish stout, with depressed head
but body never extraordinarily elongate (coral reefs, estuaries)......................................... Gobiopsis

  

16a. First spine in first and second dorsal fins rigid and pungent, and usually thickened............... 17

16b. Dorsal-fin spines thin and flexible, not pungent or thickened.............................................. 21

 

17a. Preopercle with 1-3 flat spines; nape may have small scales (coral reefs)........... Oplopomus

17b. Preopercle without spines; nape scales may be as large as body scales (or absent)............ 18

 

18a. Nape scaled, at least opercle partly scaled, preopercle may or may not be scaled; first spines of
first and second dorsal fins twice the thickness of remaining fin spines; body scales ctenoid.......... 19

18b. Nape, preopercle and opercle naked; first spine of first and second dorsal fins not much
" thicker than remaining spines; all scales cycloid (coral reefs)..................................... Echinogobius

 

19a. Preopercle and opercle fully scaled (deepwater)...................................................... Hazeus

19b. Preopercle naked, opercle partly scaled........................................................................... 20

 

20a. Opercle naked below level of upper pectoral-fin base (sand, coral reefs)........... Oplopomops

20b. Opercle scaled at least to level of upper one-third of pectoral-fin base (shallow reefs).. Opua

  

21a. Preopercle with a single large prominent spine (shallow reefs)......................... Gladiogobius

21b. Preopercle with 0-9 small spines..................................................................................... 22

 

22a. Preopercle with 1-9 spines (coral reefs)........................................................ Asterropteryx

22b. No spines on preopercle................................................................................................. 23

 

23a. First dorsal fin elongate, fin origin at rear of head opposite rear end of opercle
(coral reefs) .......................................................................................................Discordipinna

23b. First dorsal fin shape variable, fin origin behind pectoral base............................................ 24

 

24a. Cheeks with papillae in transverse pattern, papillae prominent, raised upon fleshy flaps (coral reefs,
estuaries)........................................................................................................................ Callogobius

24b. Cheeks with papillae in transverse or longitudinal pattern but without prominent vertical fleshy flaps
bearing papillae..........................................................................................................................25

 

25a. Pelvic fins with thickened lobe around each pelvic spine, frenum folded forward forming a pocket....... 26

25b. Pelvic fins with or without thickened skin around each pelvic spine, frenum flat, may be fleshy but
not folded forward ................................................................................................................ 30

 

26a. Interobital canals separate, two anterior interorbital pores present..................................... 28

26b. Interorbital canal single, one (rarely two) anterior interobital pore present.......................... 27

 

27a. Edge of lower lip fused to underside of head, lip free at chin only (coral reefs)...... Luposicya

27b. Edge of lower lip free at sides, fused at chin (coral reefs).................................. Pleurosicya

 

28a. Pectoral rays all branched; eyes small (deepwater)......................................... Lobulogobius

28b. Pectoral fins with lower 2-6 rays unbranched and tips usually thickened; eyes large........... 29

 

29a. Gill opening wide and not attached to isthmus; head broad and flattened; nape scaled
(coral reefs) .........................................................................................................Phyllogobius

29b. Gill opening wide or narrow, but always attached to isthmus; head not flattened but
may be elongate; nape usually naked (coral reefs)................................................... Bryaninops

 

30a. Chin with curved mental frenum (free fleshy flap) or distinct rounded to triangular knob..... 31

30b. Chin relatively smooth, without a mental frenum, may be slight swelling on chin just anterior
to row of sensory papillae...................................................................................................... 34

 

31a. Tips of upper pectoral-fin rays free and silk-like and no curved canine tooth in
each side of lower jaw (usually shallow reefs)......................................................... Bathygobius

31b. Tips of upper pectoral-fin rays not free or if free, then a curved canine tooth present at each
side of lower jaw  ..............................................................................................................32

 

32a. Mouth subterminal with snout partly overhanging upper lip; soft
dorsal I,10-11, anal I,9-10 (coral reefs, estuaries)............................................ Istigobius (in part)

32b. Mouth terminal; soft dorsal I,7-9, anal I,6-9...................................................................... 33

 

33a. Head depressed; tongue bilobed or deeply concave; pelvic frenum reduced or absent;
colouring usually white to yellowish with few dark markings (coral reefs, sand)................ Cabillus

33b. Head not depressed; tongue blunt to rounded; pelvic frenum always present, conspicuous;
colouring usually mottled, spotted and barred with brown (coral to rocky reefs)
................... Palutrus

 

34a. Head rounded, the ventral surface scattered with numerous small bumps, sides and top of
head covered with fleshy bumps or fine flaps (which may be close together); nape naked
(coral reefs)............................................................................................................ Paragobiodon

34b. Head without fine fleshy flaps and bumps, nape scaled or naked....................................... 35

 

35a. Head pores absent; size not greater than 50 mm SL......................................................... 36

35b. Head pores present........................................................................................................ 39

 

36a. Head papillae conspicuous, in rows which may form ridges; head depressed (coral reefs)......

........................................................................................................................................ Feia

36b. Papillae on head small, not forming ridges; head compressed or cylindrical........................ 37

 

37a. Pelvic fin rays all unbranched, or at least fifth ray unbranched (coral reefs)..........................

................................................................................................................ Trimmatom (in part)

37b. Pelvic fin rays branched; body scaled.............................................................................. 38

 

38a. Gill opening ends below rear margin of preopercle; head usually broader than deep; vertical
bars with dark borders present on head at least (coral reefs, deepwater)................................ Priolepis

38b. Gill opening extends to below eye or at least to preopercular margin; head usually deeper
than broad; colour pattern variable, often with spots on head (coral reefs).................................. Trimma

 

39a. Pelvic fins completely separate, no membrane connecting bases of fifth pelvic rays........... 40

39b. Pelvic fins partly or completely connected by membrane.................................................. 43

 

40a. Papillae on cheek include short transverse rows; gill opening extends
to below preopercle (coral reefs).................................................................... Amblyeleotris (in part)

40b. Papillae on cheek in longitudinal pattern........................................................................... 41

 

41a. Teeth in upper jaw in single row; adult size greater than 50 mm SL (coral reefs)

.......................................................................................................................... Valenciennea

41b. Teeth in upper jaw in two or more rows; adult size less than 30 mm SL............................. 42

 

42a. Fifth pelvic ray unbranched, usually considerably reduced, fin rays
many-branched, often fringe-like (coral reefs).................................................................. Eviota

42b. Fifth pelvic fin ray branched, fin rays branched at tips, but not fringe-like (coral reefs,
deepwater) ......................................................................................................Sueviota (in part)

 

43a. If any papillae rows on head are on raised fleshy ridges, then mouth not small and nearly
vertical ................................................................................................................................44

43b. Usually at least two rows of papillae on head on raised, fleshy, longitudinal
ridges; mouth small, oriented nearly vertically (estuaries).......................................... Mangarinus

 

44a. Cheeks and operculum covered with scales (may be small or embedded).......................... 45

44b. Cheeks and operculum partially scaled or naked (may be small or embedded).................... 48

45a. Headpores absent; frenum between pelvic spines absent
(deepwater)..................................................................................... Egglestonichthys (in part)

45b. Headpores present; frenum between pelvic spines present.................................... 46

 

46a. Gill opening restricted to pectoral base or to below opercle; if transverse papillae present
under eye, then snout rounded and may overhang upper lip slightly................................................. 47

46b. Gill opening very wide, extending up to below eye; 7-10 short rows of transverse papillae below eye;
snout pointed, with lower jaw tip anteriormost; 5-6 brown spots along side of body (estuaries, coastal).... Isthmogobius

 

47a. Body slender, body depth contained more than four times in SL; prominent recurved
canine tooth at angle of lower jaw (coral reefs)....................................................... …..Macrodontogobius

47b. Body deep, body depth contained less than four times in SL; no prominent recurved
canine tooth on lower jaw (coral reefs, estuaries) ........................................... …..…………….Exyrias

 

48a. Gill opening extending to below rear margin of preopercle (or farther forward)...... 49

48b. Gill opening restricted to pectoral-fin base or slightly further forward to below opercle........... 63

 

49a. Head papillae in transverse pattern, at least transverse rows present under eye...... 55

49b. Head papillae in longitudinal pattern, some rows may be very short....................... 50

 

50a. Anal fin always with one or more segmented ray than in soft dorsal (sandy shores,
estuaries) .......................................................................................................Silhouettea

50b. Anal and soft dorsal fins with equal numbers of rays, or dorsal fin with one or more ray
than anal fin ................................................................................................................. 51

 

51a. Iris lappet present in eye; tongue deeply bilobed; gill opening wide (nearly to eye) and free
of isthmus (coral reefs, estuaries)......................................................................... Psammogobius

51b. No iris lappet present; tongue may be concave but not deeply bilobed; gill opening
variable.........................................................................................................................52

 

52a. Soft dorsal and anal rays I,8-10, most papillae rows on cheek long, not reduced
(estuaries, freshwater)............................................................................... Glossogobius (in part)

52b. Soft dorsal and anal rays I,10-12; some cheek papillae rows short or broken.......... 53

 

53a. A distinct black ocellus in each dorsal fin (coral reefs)........................... Signigobius

53b. No distinct black ocellus in each dorsal fin........................................................... 54

 

54a. Caudal fin always rounded, shorter than head; body pale with dark spots and bright
white spot on pectoral fin (coral reefs)...................................................................... Ctenogobiops

54b. Caudal fin usually pointed, longer than head; body with bars, spots and/or stripes,
no bright white spot on pectoral fin (coral reefs)........................................................ Vanderhorstia

 

55a. Scales small; 44 or more in a lateral series........................................................... 57

55b. Scales large; 40 or fewer in a lateral series.......................................................... 56

 

56a. First dorsal fin tall and broad with dark bands and/or spots; body with dark oblique bars
(estuaries, coral reefs)................................................................................ Mahidolia

56b. First dorsal rounded to triangular, relatively unpatterned; body with spots and blotches
but not dark oblique bands (estuaries, mangroves).................................... Acentrogobius (in part)

 

57a. Teeth present on vomer (which is curved into mouth); body pale with distinct dark markings (coral reefs)............................................................................................................... Stonogobiops

57b. No teeth on vomer (note: vomer itself may be curved into mouth); colour variable................. 58

 

58a. Second dorsal fin rays I,12-14; anal fin rays I,12-14 (coral reefs)......................... Amblyeleotris (in part)

58b. Second dorsal fin rays I,9-11; anal fin rays I,8-10................................................. 59

 

59a. Preopercular pores absent; vertical white lines over abdomen present, especially prominent
in males (shallow reefs)........................................................................ Psilogobius (in part)

59b. Preopercular pores present; no vertical white abdominal lines present.................... 60

 

60a. No posterior oculoscapular canal or pores over top of opercle............................... 61

60b. Posterior oculoscapular canal and two pores present over top of opercle............... 62

 

61a. First dorsal fin broad and\or tall, longer than or equal to body depth; if body dark, no bright
white stripe along nape midline (shallow reefs, estuaries)....................................... Myersina (in part)

61b. First dorsal fin low, with black ocellus; body dark with nape and top of head bright white
(coral reefs)................................................................................................................. Lotilia

 

62a. Gill opening wide, membranes forming distinct free fold across isthmus, attaching to isthmus in
front of fold (shallow reefs, estuaries)................................................................... Myersina (in part)

62b. Gill opening moderately wide, membranes not forming fold across isthmus, but attaching
to sides of isthmus (coral reefs, deepwater)......................................................... Cryptocentrus

 

63a. Papillae on cheek in transverse pattern............................................................................ 64

63b. Papillae on cheek in longitudinal pattern........................................................................... 68

 

64a. Scales present on cheek, at least behind eye.................................................................... 65

64b. Cheek naked................................................................................................................. 66

 

65a. Upper half of cheek covered with scales, nape scales extend forward to snout
(deepwater)........................................................................................... Egglestonichthys (in part)

65b. Scales on cheek restricted to patch behind eye, nape scales
extend up to behind eyes (reefs, estuaries, deepwater)................................................ Acentrogobius (in part)

 

66a. Large posterolaterally-directed canine tooth on lower jaw, often visible when mouth closed;
snout rounded and overhangs upper lip in most species (coral reefs)................................ Amblygobius

66b. No large posterolaterally-directed canine tooth on lower jaw, snout not overhanging upper lip 67

 

67a. Nape naked; vertical papillae rows on mid-cheek do not extend
ventrally past lowermost longitudinal cheek row (estuaries).......................................... Lophogobius (in part)

67b. Nape usually with scales, midline may be naked; one vertical papilla row on mid-cheek extends
ventrally past lowermost longitudinal cheek row (shallow reefs, estuaries).............................. Drombus

 

68a. Cheek (and opercle) with scales; caudal fin long and slender (deepwater)...... Obliquogobius

68b. Cheek naked, opercle scaled or naked............................................................................. 69

 

69a. Cheeks swollen; mouth large, extends at least to rear edge of eye (may extend well past eye);
gill opening restricted to pectoral base (coral reefs)................................ Tomiyamichthys

69b. Cheeks not swollen; mouth reaches to below eye; gill opening to under opercle or to rear of eye.....  70

 

70a. No oculoscapular canal over opercle, preopercle with only two or no pores (coral reefs,
deepwater) ....................................................................................................Sueviota (in part)

70b. Oculoscapular canal present over opercle and preopercle with three pores........................ 71

 

71a. Pore behind eye long and slit-like (estuaries, deepwater).................................... Aulopareia

71b. Pore behind eye rounded................................................................................................ 72

 

72a.Mouth terminal; snout pointed or rounded, tip not overhanging upper lip; no free flap or
frenum on lower jaw, skin joining lower lip to isthmus.............................................................. 73

72b. Mouth subterminal; snout rounded to blunt, with tip slightly overhanging upper lip; free flap or
frenum on lower jaw in front of isthmus may be visible (coral reefs, estuaries)..
.. Istigobius (in part)

 

73a. Pre-pelvic area naked; snout relatively long, depressed and pointed; jaws ending below rear half of
eye; cheek and opercle naked; 0-4 predorsal scales present (may be embedded); second dorsal
rays I,8 (estuarine)..................................................................................................Afurcagobius

73b. Pre-pelvic area with some scales, may be large and deciduous; snout short, rounded to pointed, not
depressed; jaws may end below anterior part of eye or mid-eye; cheek and opercle naked or
partly scaled; predorsal scales present or absent; second dorsal rays I,7-11......................... 74

 

74a. Sensory papillae rows on cheek very short, papillae small and few; head pointed in dorsal view;
eyes large and set high on side of head; pelvic fins may have frenum reduced or absent; membrane
between fifth pelvic rays may be reduced, pelvic fins separate in some species; first dorsal fin
generally triangular and conspicuously marked; when live, body translucent
with black, brown and white markings (coral reefs)................................................. Fusigobius

74b. Most sensory papillae rows on cheek long (or multiple) and conspicuous; head may be pointed or
rounded in dorsal view; eye variable in size but usually not large and set high on side of head; pelvic
fins always with frenum present; fifth pelvic rays always joined by membrane; first dorsal fin shape
variable, but generally without conspicuous black marks; when live, body opaque,
colour variable.......................................................................................................... 75

 

75a. Single row of papillae usually present across rear of chin, if large patch of papillae present on
chin, then some papillae rows on side of head multiple, row directly under eye always single; snout
usually rounded; scales may be present on opercle or on cheek behind eye; dorsal spines may be
long and at least second spine filamentous in both sexes; body colour pattern variable (reefs,
estuaries, deepwater)...................................................... Acentrogobius (in part)

75a. Large patch of papillae on chin; on cheek, multiple short irregular rows of papillae (may be
vertically oriented) present between two lowermost longitudinal papillae rows and papillae row
directly under eye double, OR 5-6 longitudinal rows of papillae on cheek, none multiple; first
or second dorsal spine may be elongate in mature males; snout short and pointed; no scales on
cheek or opercle; body whitish to pale yellowish with fine dark spots and speckles, dark spots
along mid-side of body smaller than eye (sandy habitats near shallow reefs and estuaries)............. Favonigobius

 

 


 

List of marine and brackish water species occurring in the area.

 

Species which live in freshwater but may occur in estuaries as adults or larvae are marked by

an asterisk (*). Listed are 105 genera (including three new genera for described species of

amblyopines), and 534 species (undescribed species not included).

 

Subfamily AMBLYOPINAE

Amblyotrypauchen arctocephalus (Alcock, 1890)

 

Brachyamblyopus brachysoma (Bleeker, 1853)

 

Caragobius coecus (Weber, 1913)

Caragobius geomys Fowler, 1935.

Caragobius monserrati (Roxas and Ablan, 1940)

Caragobius olivaceus (Herre, 1927)

Caragobius rubristriatus (Saville-Kent, 1889)

Caragobius typhlops Smith and Seale, 1906

Caragobius urolepis (Bleeker, 1852)

 

Ctenotrypauchen microcephalus (Bleeker, 1860)

 

New genus (A) jacksoni (Smith, 1943)

New genus (B) nigrimarginatus (Hora, 1924)

New genus (C) sumatranus (Volz, 1903)

 

Odontamblyopus rubicundus (Hamilton-Buchanan, 1822)

Odontamblyopus tenuis (Day, 1876)

 

Pseudotrypauchen multiradiatus Hardenberg, 1931

 

Taenioides anguillaris (Linnaeus, 1758)

Taenioides caniscapulus Roxas and Ablan, 1938

Taenioides cirratus (Blyth, 1860)

Taenioides eruptionis (Bleeker, 1849)

Taenioides gracilis (Valenciennes, 1837)

Taenioides mordax (De Vis, 1883)

Taenioides purpurascens (De Vis, 1884)

 

Trypauchen totoyensis (Garman, 1903)

Trypauchen raha Popta, 1922

Trypauchen taenia Koumans, 1953

Trypauchen vagina (Bloch and Schneider, 1801)

 

Trypauchenichthys sumatrensis Hardenberg, 1931

Trypauchenichthys typus (Bleeker, 1860)

 

Subfamily GOBIINAE

Acentrogobius audax Smith, 1959 

Acentrogobius bifrenatus (Kner, 1856) 

Acentrogobius caninus (Valenciennes, 1837)

Acentrogobius frenatus (Günther, 1861) 

Acentrogobius gracilis (Bleeker, 1875) 

Acentrogobius janthinopterus (Bleeker, 1852) 

Acentrogobius leftwichi (Ogilby, 1910) 

Acentrogobius madraspatensis (Day, 1868) 

Acentrogobius moloanus (Herre, 1927) 

Acentrogobius nebulosus (Forsskal, 1775)

Acentrogobius pyrops (Whitley, 1954)

Acentrogobius suluensis (Herre, 1927) 

Acentrogobius viganensis (Steindachner, 1893)

Acentrogobius viridipunctatus (Valenciennes, 1837)

 

Afurcagobius tamarensis (Johnston, 1883)

 

Amblyeleotris aurora (Polunin and Lubbock, 1977)

Amblyeleotris callopareia Polunin and Lubbock, 1979

Amblyeleotris delicatulus Smith, 1958 

Amblyeleotris diagonalis Polunin and Lubbock, 1979

Amblyeleotris exilis (Smith, 1958) 

Amblyeleotris fasciata (Herre, 1953) 

Amblyeleotris fontanesii (Bleeker, 1852) 

Amblyeleotris guttata (Fowler, 1938) 

Amblyeleotris gymnocephala (Bleeker, 1853) 

Amblyeleotris japonica Takagi, 1957 

Amblyeleotris latifasciata Polunin and Lubbock, 1979

Amblyeleotris macronema Polunin and Lubbock, 1979

Amblyeleotris novaecaledoniae Goren, 1981

Amblyeleotris ogasawarensis Yanagisawa, 1978

Amblyeleotris periophthalma (Bleeker, 1853) 

Amblyeleotris randalli Hoese and Steene, 1978

Amblyeleotris rhyax Polunin and Lubbock, 1979

Amblyeleotris steinitzi (Klausewitz, 1974)

Amblyeleotris sungami (Klausewitz, 1969)

Amblyeleotris wheeleri Polunin and Lubbock, 1977

Amblyeleotris yanoi Aonuma and Yoshino, 1996

 

Amblygobius buanensis (Herre, 1927) 

Amblygobius bynoensis (Richardson, 1844)

Amblygobius decussatus (Bleeker, 1855) 

Amblygobius esakiae (Herre, 1939) 

Amblygobius hectori (Smith, 1956) 

Amblygobius linki Herre, 1927 

Amblygobius nocturnus (Herre, 1945) 

Amblygobius phalaena (Valenciennes, 1837)

Amblygobius rainfordi (Whitley, 1940) 

Amblygobius sphynx (Valenciennes, 1837)

 

Asterropteryx bipunctatus Allen and Munday, 1995

Asterropteryx ensiferus (Bleeker, 1874) 

Asterropteryx semipunctatus (Rüppell, 1830) 

Asterropteryx spinosus (Goren, 1981) 

Asterropteryx striatus Allen and Munday, 1995

 

Aulopareia atripinnatus (Smith, 1931)

Aulopareia cyanomos (Bleeker, 1849)

Aulopareia janetae Smith, 1945

Aulopareia koumansi (Herre, 1937)

Aulopareia spilopterus (Smith, 1932)

Aulopareia unicolor (Valenciennes, 1837)

 

Austrolethops wardi Whitley, 1935 

 

Barbuligobius boehlkei Lachner and McKinney, 1974

 

Bathygobius albopunctatus (Valenciennes, 1837)

Bathygobius coalitus (Bennett, 1832) 

Bathygobius cocosensis (Bleeker, 1854) 

Bathygobius cotticeps (Steindachner, 1880)

Bathygobius cyclopterus (Valenciennes, 1837)

Bathygobius fuscus (Rüppell, 1830) 

Bathygobius kreffti (Steindachner, 1866)

Bathygobius laddi (Fowler, 1931) 

Bathygobius meggitti (Hora and Mukerji, 1936)

Bathygobius padangensis (Bleeker, 1851) 

Bathygobius panayensis (Jordan and Seale, 1907)

Bathygobius petrophilus (Bleeker, 1853) 

 

Bryaninops amplus Larson, 1985 

Bryaninops diannae Larson, 1985 

Bryaninops erythrops (Jordan and Seale, 1906)

Bryaninops isis Larson, 1985 

Bryaninops loki Larson, 1985 

Bryaninops natans Larson, 1985 

Bryaninops nexus Larson, 1987 

Bryaninops ridens Smith, 1959 

Bryaninops tigris Larson, 1985 

Bryaninops yongei (Davis and Cohen, 1969)

 

Cabillus lacertops Smith, 1959 

Cabillus macrophthalmus (Weber, 1909)

Cabillus tongarevae (Fowler, 1927) 

 

Callogobius bauchotae Goren, 1979 

Callogobius centrolepis Weber, 1909 

Callogobius clitellus McKinney and Lachner, 1978

Callogobius crassus McKinney and Lachner, 1984

Callogobius depressus (Ramsay and Ogilby, 1886)

Callogobius flavobrunneus (Smith, 1958) 

Callogobius hasselti (Bleeker, 1851) 

Callogobius hastatus McKinney and Lachner, 1978

Callogobius liolepis Koumans, 1931 

Callogobius maculipinnis (Fowler, 1918) 

Callogobius okinawae Snyder, 1908) 

Callogobius sclateri (Steindachner, 1880)

Callogobius stellatus McKinney and Lachner, 1978

Callogobius tanegasimae (Snyder, 1908) 

 

Cristatogobius albius Tchaw-ren, 1959

Cristatogobius lophius Herre, 1927 

Cristatogobius nonatoae (Ablan, 1940) 

 

Cryptocentroides cristatus (Macleay, 1881)

Cryptocentroides insignis (Seale, 1910) 

 

Cryptocentrus albidorsus Yanagisawa, 1978

Cryptocentrus bulbiceps (Whitley, 1953) 

Cryptocentrus caeruleomaculatus (Herre, 1933)

Cryptocentrus cebuanus Herre, 1927 

Cryptocentrus cinctus (Herre, 1936) 

Cryptocentrus cyanotaenia (Bleeker, 1853) 

Cryptocentrus diproctotaenia (Bleeker, 1876) 

Cryptocentrus fasciatus (Playfair, 1866) 

Cryptocentrus filifer (Valenciennes, 1837)

Cryptocentrus inexplicatus (Herre, 1934) 

Cryptocentrus insignitus (Whitley, 1956) 

Cryptocentrus leonis Smith, 1931 

Cryptocentrus leptocephalus Bleeker, 1876 

Cryptocentrus leucostictus (Gunther, 1872) 

Cryptocentrus lutheri Klausewitz, 1960

Cryptocentrus maudae Fowler, 1937 

Cryptocentrus niveatus (Valenciennes, 1837)

Cryptocentrus obliquus (Herre, 1934) 

Cryptocentrus pavoninoides (Bleeker, 1854) 

Cryptocentrus pretiosus (Rendahl, 1924) 

Cryptocentrus shigensis Kuroda, 1956 

Cryptocentrus strigilliceps (Jordan and Seale, 1906)

Cryptocentrus wehrlei Fowler, 1937 

 

Ctenogobiops aurocingulus (Herre, 1935) 

Ctenogobiops crocineus Smith, 1959 

Ctenogobiops feroculus Lubbock and Polunin, 1977

Ctenogobiops pomastictus Lubbock and Polunin, 1977

Ctenogobiops tangaroai Lubbock and Polunin, 1977

 

Discordipinna griessingeri Hoese and Fourmanoir, 1978

 

Drombus dentifer Hora, 1923 

Drombus globiceps (Hora 1923) 

Drombus halei (Whitley, 1935) 

Drombus kranjiensis (Herre, 1940) 

Drombus ocyurus Jordan and Seale, 1906

Drombus simulus (Smith, 1960)

Drombus triangularis (Weber, 1911) 

 

Echinogobius hayashii Iwata, Hosoya and Niimura, 1998

 

Egglestonichthys bombylios Larson and Hoese, 1997

Egglestonichthys melanoptera (Rao, 1971) 

 

Eviota afelei Jordan and Seale, 1906

Eviota albolineata Jewett and Lachner, 1983

Eviota bifasciata Lachner and Karnella, 1980

Eviota cometa Jewett and Lachner, 1983

Eviota distigma Jordan and Seale, 1906

Eviota fasciola Karnella and Lachner, 1981

Eviota herrei Jordan and Seale, 1906 

Eviota infulata (Smith, 1956) 

Eviota irrasa Karnella and Lachner, 1981

Eviota lachdeberei Giltay, 1933 

Eviota latifasciata Jewett and Lachner, 1983

Eviota melasma Lachner and Karnella, 1980

Eviota monostigma Fourmanoir, 1971 

Eviota nebulosa Smith, 1958 

Eviota nigriventris Giltay, 1933 

Eviota pellucida Larson, 1976 

Eviota prasina (Klunzinger, 1871) 

Eviota prasites Jordan and Seale, 1906 

Eviota pseudostigma Lachner and Karnella, 1980

Eviota punctulata Jewett and Lachner, 1983

Eviota queenslandica Whitley, 1932 

Eviota saipanensis Fowler, 1945 

Eviota sebreei Jordan and Seale, 1906

Eviota sigillata Jewett and Lachner, 1983

Eviota smaragdus Jordan and Seale, 1906

Eviota sparsa Jewett and Lachner, 1983

Eviota spilota Lachner and Karnella, 1980

Eviota storthynx (Rofen, 1959) 

Eviota variola Lachner and Karnella, 1980

Eviota zebrina Lachner and Karnella, 1978

Eviota zonura Jordan and Seale, 1906

 

Exyrias belissimus (Smith, 1959) 

Exyrias ferrarisi Murdy, 1985 

Exyrias puntang (Bleeker, 1851) 

 

Favonigobius exquisitus Whitley, 1950 

Favonigobius lentiginosus (Richardson, 1844)

Favonigobius melanobranchus (Fowler, 1934)

Favonigobius opalescens (Herre, 1936)

Favonigobius reichei (Bleeker, 1853) 

 

Feia nympha Smith, 1959 

 

Fusigobius duospilos Hoese and Reader, 1985

Fusigobius longispinus Goren, 1978 

Fusigobius neophytus (Günther, 1877) 

Fusigobius signipinnis Hoese and Obika, 1988

 

Gladiogobius ensifer Herre, 1933 

 

Glossogobius aureus Akihito and Meguro, 1975

Glossogobius bicirrhosus (Weber, 1894) 

Glossogobius celebius (Valenciennes, 1837)

Glossogobius circumspectus (Macleay, 1883)

Glossogobius giuris (Hamilton, 1822)

Glossogobius sparsipapillus Akihito and Meguro, 1976

 

Gobiodon acicularis Harold and Winterbottom, 1995

Gobiodon albofasciatus Sawada and Arai, 1972

Gobiodon atrangulatus Garman, 1903 

Gobiodon axillaris De Vis, 1884 

Gobiodon brochus Harold and Winterbottom, 1999

Gobiodon ceramensis (Bleeker, 1852) 

Gobiodon citrinus (Rüppell, 1838) 

Gobiodon fulvus Herre, 1927 

Gobiodon heterospilos Bleeker, 1856 

Gobiodon histrio (Valenciennes, 1837)

Gobiodon micropus Günther, 1861 

Gobiodon okinawae Sawada, Arai and Abe, 1972

Gobiodon quinquestrigatus (Valenciennes, 1837)

Gobiodon reticulatus Playfair, 1866 

Gobiodon rivulatus (Rüppell, 1830) 

Gobiodon spilophthalmus Fowler, 1944 

Gobiodon unicolor (Castelnau, 1873)

 

Gobiopsis angustifrons Lachner and McKinney, 1978

Gobiopsis aporia Lachner and McKinney, 1978

Gobiopsis bravoi (Herre, 1940) 

Gobiopsis exigua Lachner and McKinney, 1979

Gobiopsis macrostoma Steindachner, 1861

Gobiopsis malekulae (Herre, 1935) 

Gobiopsis quinquecincta (Smith, 1931) 

Gobiopsis springeri Lachner and McKinney, 1979

Gobiopsis woodsi Lachner and McKinney, 1978

 

Hazeus otakii Jordan and Snyder, 1901

 

Hetereleotris poecila (Fowler, 1946) 

 

Isthmogobius baliurus (Valenciennes, 1837)

 

Istigobius decoratus (Herre, 1927) 

Istigobius diadema (Steindachner, 1877)

Istigobius goldmanni (Bleeker, 1852) 

Istigobius hoesei Murdy and McEachran, 1982

Istigobius nigroocellatus (Günther, 1873) 

Istigobius ornatus (Rüppell, 1830) 

Istigobius rigilius (Herre, 1953) 

Istigobius spence (Smith, 1947) 

 

Kellogella quindecimfasciata (Fowler, 1946)

Kelloggella cardinalis Jordan and Seale, 1906

 

Lobulogobius morrigu Larson, 1983 

Lobulogobius omanensis Koumans, 1944 

 

Lophogobius bleekeri Popta, 1921 

 

Lotilia graciliosa Klausewitz, 1960

 

Lubricogobius ornatus Fourmanoir, 1966

Lubricogobius pumilis Larson and Hoese, 1980

 

Luposicya lupus Smith, 1959 

 

Macrodontogobius wilburi Herre, 1936 

 

Mahidolia mystacina (Valenciennes, 1837)

 

Mangarinus waterousi Herre, 1943 

 

Myersina crocatus Wongratana, 1975

Myersina lachneri Hoese and Lubbock, 1982

Myersina macrostoma Herre, 1934 

Myersina nigrivirgata Akihito and Meguro, 1983

Myersina papuensis (Peters, 1876)

 

Obliquogobius cometes (Alcock, 1890) 

 

Oplopomops diacanthus (Schultz, 1943) 

 

Oplopomus caninoides (Bleeker, 1852) 

Oplopomus oplopomus (Valenciennes, 1837)

 

Opua nephodes Jordan, 1925 

 

Palutrus pruinosa (Jordan and Seale, 1906)

Palutrus scapulopunctatus (Beaufort, 1912)

 

Parachaeturichthys ocellatus (Day, 1873) 

Parachaeturichthys polynema (Bleeker, 1853) 

 

Paragobiodon echinocephalus (Rüppell, 1830) 

Paragobiodon lacunicolus (Kendall and Goldsborough, 1911)

Paragobiodon melanosomus (Bleeker, 1852) 

Paragobiodon modestus (Regan, 1908) 

Paragobiodon xanthosomus (Bleeker, 1852) 

 

Parkraemeria ornata Whitley, 1951 

 

Phyllogobius platycephalops (Smith, 1964) 

 

Platygobiopsis akihito Springer and Randall, 1992

 

Pleurosicya annandalei Hornell and Fowler, 1922

Pleurosicya australis Larson, 1990 

Pleurosicya bilobata (Koumans, 1941)

Pleurosicya boldinghi Weber, 1913 

Pleurosicya carolinensis Larson, 1990 

Pleurosicya coerulea Larson, 1990 

Pleurosicya elongata Larson, 1990 

Pleurosicya fringilla Larson, 1990 

Pleurosicya labiata (Weber, 1913) 

Pleurosicya micheli Fourmanoir, 1971

Pleurosicya mossambica Smith, 1959 

Pleurosicya muscarum (Jordan and Seale, 1906)

Pleurosicya plicata Larson, 1990 

Pleurosicya prognatha Goren, 1984 

Pleurosicya spongicola Larson, 1990 

 

Priolepis agrena Winterbottom and Burridge, l993

Priolepis ailina Winterbottom and Burridge, l993

Priolepis aithiops Winterbottom and Burridge, l992

Priolepis aureoviridis (Gosline, 1959) 

Priolepis cincta (Regan, 1908) 

Priolepis compita Winterbottom, 1985

Priolepis fallacincta Winterbottom and Burridge, l992

Priolepis inhaca (Smith, 1949) 

Priolepis kappa Winterbottom and Burridge, 1991

Priolepis nocturna (Smith, 1957) 

Priolepis nuchifasciata (Günther, 1973) 

Priolepis pallidicincta Winterbottom and Burridge, l993

Priolepis profunda (Weber, 1909) 

Priolepis semidoliata (Valenciennes, 1837)

Priolepis squamogena Winterbottom and Burridge, 1989

Priolepis sticta Winterbottom and Burridge, l992

Priolepis triops Winterbottom and Burridge, l993

 

Psammogobius biocellatus (Valenciennes, 1837)

 

Psilogobius mainlandi Baldwin, 1972 

Psilogobius prolatus Watson and Lachner, 1985

 

Signigobius biocellatus Hoese and Allen, 1977

 

Silhouettea evanida Larson and Miller, 1986

Silhouettea hoesei Larson and Miller, 1986

Silhouettea insinuans Smith, 1959 

Silhouettea nuchipunctatus (Herre, 1934) 

 

Stonogobiops nematodes Hoese and Randall, 1982

Stonogobiops xanthorhinica Hoese and Randall, 1982

 

Sueviota aprica Winterbottom and Hoese, 1988

Sueveiota lachneri Winterbottom and Hoese, 1988

Sueviota larsonae Winterbottom and Hoese, 1988

 

Tomiyamichthys latruncularia (Klausewitz, 1974)

Tomiyamichthys oni (Tomiyama, 1936)

 

Trimma benjamini Winterbottom, 1996

Trimma caesiura Jordan and Seale, 1906

Trimma caudimaculata Yoshino and Araga, 1977

Trimma emeryi Winterbottom, 1985

Trimma grammistes (Tomiyama, 1936)

Trimma griffithsi Winterbottom, 1984

Trimma hoesei Winterbottom, 1984

Trimma macrophthalma (Tomiyama, 1936)

Trimma mendelssohni (Goren, 1978)

Trimma naudei Smith, 1956

Trimma necopinna Whitley, 1959

Trimma okinawae (Aoyagi, 1949)

Trimma rubromaculata Allen and Munday, 1995

Trimma sheppardi Winterbottom, 1984

Trimma striata (Herre, 1945) 

Trimma taylori Lobel, 1979 

Trimma tevegae Cohen and Davis, 1969

Trimma unisquamis (Gosline, 1959) 

 

Trimmatom eviotops (Schultz, 1943) 

Trimmatom macropodus Winterbottom, 1989

Trimmatom nanus Winterbottom and Emery, 1981

Trimmatom sagma Winterbottom, 1989

Trimmatom zapotes Winterbottom, 1989

 

Valenciennea alleni Hoese and Larson, 1994

Valenciennea bella Hoese and Larson, 1994

Valenciennea decora Hoese and Larson, 1994

Valenciennea helsdingeni (Bleeker, 1858) 

Valenciennea immaculata Ni, 1981 

Valenciennea limicola Hoese and Larson, 1994

Valenciennea longipinnis (Lay and Bennett 1839)

Valenciennea muralis (Valenciennes, 1837)

Valenciennea parva Hoese and Larson, 1994

Valenciennea puellaris (Tomiyama, 1955)

Valenciennea randalli Hoese and Larson, 1994

Valenciennea sexguttata (Valenciennes, 1837)

Valenciennea strigata (Broussonet, 1782)

Valenciennea wardi (Playfair, 1866) 

 

Vanderhorstia ambanoro (Fourmanoir, 1957)

Vanderhorstia flavilineata Allen and Munday, 1995

Vanderhorstia lanceolata Yanagisawa, 1978

Vanderhorstia mertensii Klausewitz, 1974

Vanderhorstia ornatissima Smith, 1959 

 

Subfamily GOBIONELLINAE

*Awaous acritosus Watson, 1994 

*Awaous guamensis Valenciennes, 1837

*Awaous litturatus (Steindachner, 1860)

*Awaous melanocephalus (Bleeker, 1849)

*Awaous ocellaris (Broussonet, 1782)

 

Brachygobius doriae (Günther, 1868) 

Brachygobius kabiliensis Inger, 1958 

Brachygobius xanthozona (Bleeker, 1849) 

 

Calamiana kabilia (Herre, 1940) 

Calamiana mindora (Herre, 1945) 

Calamiana variegata (Peters, 1869) 

 

Chlamydogobius ranunculus (Larson, 1995)

 

Eugnathogobius microps Smith, 1931 

 

Gnatholepis anjerensis (Bleeker, 1851)

Gnatholepis cauerensis (Bleeker, 1853)

Gnatholepis deltoides (Seale, 1901)

Gnatholepis inconsequens Whitley, 1958

Gnatholepis scapulostigma Herre, 1953

 

Gobiopterus brachypterus (Bleeker, 1855)

Gobiopterus chuno (Hamilton, 1822)

Gobiopterus luzonensis (Smith, 1902)

Gobiopterus panayensis (Herre, 1944)

Gobiopterus semivestitus (Munro, 1949)

 

Hemigobius hoevenii (Bleeker, 1851)

Hemigobius mingi (Herre, 1936)

 

Mugilogobius cavifrons (Weber, 1909)

Mugilogobius chulae (Smith, 1932)

Mugilogobius fusca (Herre, 1940)

Mugilogobius fusculus (Nichols, 1951)

Mugilogobius mertoni (Weber, 1911)

Mugilogobius notospilus (Gunther, 1877)

Mugilogobius platynotus (Gunther, 1861)

Mugilogobius platystomus (Gunther, 1872)

Mugilogobius rambaiae (Smith, 1945)

Mugilogobius stigmaticus (De Vis, 1884)

 

Oligolepis acutipennis (Valenciennes, 1837)

Oligolepis jaarmani (Weber, 1913)

Oligolepis stomias (Smith, 1941)

 

Oxyurichthys auchenolepis Bleeker, 1867

Oxyurichthys cornutus McCulloch and Waite, 1918

Oxyurichthys lonchotus (Jenkins, 1903)

Oxyurichthys microlepis (Bleeker, 1849)

Oxyurichthys notonema (Weber, 1909)

Oxyurichthys ophthalmonema (Bleeker, 1856)

Oxyurichthys papuensis (Valenciennes, 1837)

Oxyurichthys takagi Pezold, 1998

Oxyurichthys tentacularis (Valenciennes, 1837)

Oxyurichthys uronema (Weber, 1909)

 

Pandaka pusilla Herre, 1927

Pandaka pygmaea Herre, 1927

Pandaka rouxi (Weber, 1911)

Pandaka trimaculata Akihito and Meguro, 1975

Pandaka lidwilli (McCulloch, 1917)

 

Pseudogobius avicennia (Herre, 1940)

Pseudogobius javanicus (Bleeker, 1856)

Pseudogobius melanosticta (Day, 1876)

Pseudogobius poicilosoma (Bleeker, 1849)

 

Redigobius balteatus (Herre, 1935)

Redigobius bikolanus (Herre, 1927)

Redigobius chrysosomus (Bleeker, 1875)

Redigobius macrostomus (Gunther, 1861)

Rediogbius roemeri (Weber, 1911)

 

*Rhinogobius giurinus (Rutter, 1897)

 

*Stenogobius alleni Watson, 1991

*Stenogobius beauforti (Weber, 1908)

*Stenogobius blokzeyli (Bleeker, 1861)

*Stenogobius caudimaculosus Watson, 1991

*Stenogobius fehlmanni Watson, 1991

*Stenogobius gymnopomus (Bleeker, 1853)

*Stenogobius hoesei Watson, 1991

*Stenogobius ingeri Watson, 1991

*Stenogobius kyphosus Watson, 1991

*Stenogobius lachneri Watson, 1994

*Stenogobius laterisquamatus (Weber, 1905)

*Stenogobius marinus Watson, 1991

*Stenogobius marqueti Watson, 1991

*Stenogobius ophthalmoporus (Bleeker, 1853)

*Stenogobius psilosinionus Watson, 1991

*Stenogobius randalli Watson, 1991

*Stenogobius squamosus Watson, 1991

*Stenogobius zurstrasseni (Popta, 1912)

 

Stigmatogobius borneensis (Bleeker, 1851)

Stigmatogobius pleurostigma (Bleeker, 1849)

Stigmatogobius sadanundio (Hamilton, 1822)

Stigmatogobius sella (Steindachner, 1881)

 

Subfamily OXUDERCINAE

Apocryptodon madurensis (Bleeker, 1849)

 

Boleophthalmus birdsongi Murdy, 1989 

Boleophthalmus boddarti (Pallas, 1770) 

Boleophthalmus caeruleomaculatus McCulloch and Waite, 1918

 

Oxuderces dentatus (Eydoux and Souleyet, 1848)

Oxuderces wirzi (Koumans, 1937)

 

Parapocryptes serperaster (Richardson, 1846)

 

Periophthalmodon freycineti (Valenciennes, 1824)

Periophthalmodon schlosseri (Pallas, 1770)

Periophthalmodon septemradiatus (Hamilton, 1822)

 

Periophthalmus argentilineatus Valenciennes, 1837

Periophthalmus chrysospilos Bleeker, 1852

Periophthalmus gracilis Eggert, 1935

Periophthalmus kalolo Lesson, 1830

Periophthalmus malaccensis Eggert, 1935

Periophthalmus minutus Eggert, 1935

Periophthalmus novaeguineaensis Eggert, 1935

Periophthalmus novemradiatus (Hamilton, 1822)

Periophthalmus weberi Eggert, 1935

 

Pseudapocryptes borneensis (Bleeker, 1855)

Pseudapocryptes lanceolatus (Bloch and Schneider, 1801)

 

Scartelaos histophorus (Valenciennes, 1837)

 

Subfamily SICYDIINAE

*Lentipes crittersius Watson and Allen, 1999

*Lentipes dimetrodon Watson and Allen, 1999

*Lentipes watsoni Allen, 1997

*Lentipes whittenorum Watson and Kottelat, 1994

 

*Sicyopterus cynocephalus (Valenciennes, 1837)

*Sicyopterus eudentatus Parenti and Maciolek, 1993

*Sicyopterus hageni Popta, 1921

*Sicyopterus japonicus (Tanaka, 1909)

*Sicyopterus lividis Parenti and Maciolek, 1993

*Sicyopterus longifilis De Beaufort, 1912

*Sicyopterus macrostetholepis (Bleeker, 1853)

*Sicyopterus marquesensis Fowler, 1932

*Sicyopterus microcephalus (Bleeker, 1854)

*Sicyopterus micrurus (Bleeker, 1853)

*Sicyopterus ouwensi Weber, 1913

*Sicyopterus parvei (Bleeker, 1853)

*Sicyopterus pugnans (Ogilvie-Grant, 1884)

*Sicyopterus taeniurus (Gunther, 1877)

*Sicyopterus wichmanni De Beaufort, 1912

 

*Sicyopus auxilimentus Watson and Kottelat, 1994

*Sicyopus bitaeniatus Maugé et al., 1986

*Sicyopus discordipinnis Watson, 1995

*Sicyopus fehlmanni Parenti and Maciolek, 1993

*Sicyopus leprurus Sakai and Nakamura, 1979

*Sicyopus multisquamatus De Beaufort, 1912

*Sicyopus mystax Watson and Allen, 1999

*Sicyopus nigriradiatus Parenti and Maciolek, 1993

*Sicyopus zosterophorum (Bleeker, 1856)

 

*Stiphodon allen Watson, 1996

*Stiphodon astilbos Ryan, 1986

*Stiphodon atratus Watson, 1996

*Stiphodon atropurpureus (Herre, 1927)

*Stiphodon birdsong Watson, 1996

*Stiphodon caeruleus Parenti and Maciolek, 1993

*Stiphodon elegans (Steindachner, 1859)

*Stiphodon hydroreibatus Watson, 1999

*Stiphodon larson Watson, 1996

*Stiphodon olivaceus Watson and Kottelat, 1995

*Stiphodon ornatus Meinken, 1974

*Stiphodon pelewensis Herre, 1936

*Stiphodon rutilaureus Watson, 1996

*Stiphodon semoni Weber, 1895

*Stiphodon stevensoni (Jordan and Seale, 1906)

*Stiphodon surrufus Watson and Kottelat, 1995

*Stiphodon zebrinus Watson, Allen and Kottelat, 1998